Author Topic: Newbie  (Read 310 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Traquair

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Newbie
« on: 03 March, 2019, 12:12:37 »
Hello
I'm pretty new to this game and recently joined the club. I recently obtained a B40 which had been lying in a shed for 40 years. I'm planing to restore the machine. Much of  the chrome work is in very poor condition. My query is - is it cost effective to have the chrome work re-plated where possible or replace with new parts where available.

berniej

  • Royal Star
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • View Profile
Re: Newbie
« Reply #1 on: 03 March, 2019, 14:45:10 »
Hi and welcome.

Re-plating has become an expensive business - particularly in UK - in recent years and getting a really good job can be very expensive.
There's a trade-off between how important it is to keep to original parts and the cost to do so.

For example, I'm also restoring a B40 at the moment but regularly restore bikes that have badly rusted rims, fork oil seal holders, fork cap screws, handlebar bolts etc and have found that the cost to re-plate is considerably higher than the cost to replace.

Much as I love my B40, M21 and a Matchless lightweight I've just restored (actually I can't love the Matchless although I've tried) they're not really special enough to warrant the cost of re-plating IMHO.

Replacement rims are readily available in a choice of chrome or stainless - and in varying qualities too. Also there are now some chrome-effect powder coats available that are getting pretty close although will never match the shine of true chrome.

Cheers,
Bernie



 
'49 M21/B31 hybrid
'56 M21 combination
Bantam D7
C15 project
B40 Sportsman project

elevensies

  • Blue Star
  • **
  • Posts: 75
    • View Profile
Re: Newbie
« Reply #2 on: 04 March, 2019, 10:58:39 »
i couldn't agree more here on this, unless you really want an outstanding B40 and try keep it that way, just restore it to he best you can with what you have and try pick up better looking parts along the way. this way you will enjoy the ride so much more knowing that its a bike to be ridden not one for a show (unless you really want a show bike that is)


Much as I love my B40, M21 and a Matchless lightweight I've just restored (actually I can't love the Matchless although I've tried) they're not really special enough to warrant the cost of re-plating IMHO.

Replacement rims are readily available in a choice of chrome or stainless - and in varying qualities too. Also there are now some chrome-effect powder coats available that are getting pretty close although will never match the shine of true chrome.


Crashtestdummy

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Newbie
« Reply #3 on: 16 March, 2019, 21:14:48 »
Hi guys,

As a recent member and newcomer to British bikes of vintage I am in two minds as to what is best, my 1953 c11 is to coin a phrase in oily rag condition, it runs and rides with the help from people on here and is great fun to ride but some would say horrible to look at, but I love here as she is battle scared and showing her age just like me.

Andy

Bees

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Newbie
« Reply #4 on: 17 March, 2019, 17:40:58 »
It is of course a personal choice.

I think if I were you I would wait a bit. The good weather is nearly here so I would ride it as it is and get some enjoyment from it now. You don't change the riding experience by making it shiny after all.

The cost is the other thing to consider. I reckon to do a bike really well you have to be looking at 1.5k plus. If your going to go for stainless wheels and spokes. Painted frame. All new chrome, a professional paint job new seat cover etc etc.

You wont necessarily increase the value of the bike by the amount you spend. Bikes with patina can be just as valuable.