Author Topic: Terminology  (Read 462 times)

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Oliver Pi

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Terminology
« on: 31 January, 2022, 21:17:33 »
I have received help and learned many a thing on this forum.  An unexpected forum bonus is seeing the different phrases, oaths, idioms and such. 
I came across the expression "bloody goblins" recently and I certainly want to add it to my vocabulary!  It seems that the phrase is used for surprise or frustration; something like that.  If you folks have any advice on the proper use of "bloody goblins" it would be appreciated.
Farewell for now,
Oliver

DAVE BRADY

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #1 on: 01 February, 2022, 08:18:43 »
Good morning Oliver,

A goblin is described as "an ugly or grotesque sprite that is usually mischievous and sometimes evil and malicious". So we see a goblin as a sprite, imp or gremlin that is causing faults and problems that we have not expected or are persistent
"Bloody" used in this context is mild swear word and said to have originated from a group of aristocratic rowdies known as "bloods".  Hence used to exaggerate when something goes wrong such as a 'bloody mess' when you prop your porridge on the carpet or you bike leaks oil on the garage floor.   
Put the two together and we have 'Bloody Goblins'.

Mythology says that they are invisible to the human eye but live in the seldom disturbed corners of garages and sheds waiting to do their best to thwart our efforts. 
Often it is the 'Shed Goblins' that move tools and hide the parts you have just put on the bench.  They will also mess with ignition timing and tappet settings when you go for a cup of tea before putting the covers back on.
Even in the tidiest workshop a Goblin will find a place to hide and cause chaos and frustration whenever possible.
My advice is to finish the job in hand before leaving the workshop or if you have to, check things over just in case.

Goblins will also eat your 'round tuits' causing even more complications in our lives.

Dave.

chaz

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #2 on: 01 February, 2022, 08:25:07 »
I wouldnt say Ive heard the term but if you go back to WW2 it was well known as Gremlins in the Royal Air Force.
when a plane took off for a raid any vibrations, odd noises,  things missing or generally out of the normal would have been blamed on Gremlins.
Presumably someone might have hear of Goblins or the use of Gremlins and swapped the two.
if you Wiki Gremlins (disambiguous) its a one liner being mischevious, Wiki Goblins its a bit more expansive.

in short Gremlins normally happening Goblins blamed for missing,
riding along you hear a rattle, its Gremlins, working on the bike and lost a nut or tool , the Goblins have taken it.

Dave, beat me to it.
I would add, there would be regional variations with different names.
« Last Edit: 01 February, 2022, 08:26:44 by chaz »

berniej

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #3 on: 01 February, 2022, 08:41:47 »
Dave,

A wonderful explanation.... I'm impressed that you've actually got (or rather had before they were eaten) some round tuits.
I always wanted some of these but for some reason it never happened....

Historical note - 'bloody' may also be a contraction of 'By'r Lady' which was itself a contraction of 'By our Lady', a common expression of surprise etc. dating back to Tudor times.

The goblins at my place seem to have taken up residence in the SU carb on my Ariel - I'm sure that's why it won't start.

Cheers,
Bernie

'49 M21/B31 hybrid
'56 M21 combination
B40 Super Star
A50CC project

idie

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #4 on: 01 February, 2022, 10:06:01 »
Much like the Tommy Knockers in the Cornise  mines who used to knock to tell the miners where the rich seams were then steal their food as reward.

Mike Farmer

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #5 on: 01 February, 2022, 11:13:33 »
 :) :) :) :)

I only know it as gremlins, Same explanation. The other one I understood to be "by the blood of the virgin". Its handy when you have no one to blame and no explanation for a problem. Electrical problems are always caused by "wiggley amps". Mistakes are always cock ups, balls ups or some similar lavatory based expletive??

Mike 8) 8) 8)

berniej

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #6 on: 01 February, 2022, 13:05:27 »
Back in my yoof, as a programmer, 'code pixies' were often responsible for the unpredictable nature of computer software.

Sometimes this could be quite serious - especially when building missile control systems and may well have been the reason that a Mk24 Tigerfish torpedo once decided to leave the sea and experience life on the golf links near Deal - how those pixies laughed....

Cheers,
Bernie

« Last Edit: 01 February, 2022, 14:02:20 by berniej »
'49 M21/B31 hybrid
'56 M21 combination
B40 Super Star
A50CC project

Oliver Pi

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #7 on: 01 February, 2022, 13:59:32 »
Stupendous!  Many thanks for the usage and derivation lessons.  I have certainly blamed unexplained occurrences on sunspots;  bloody gremlins now joins the team. 
Oliver

chaz

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #8 on: 01 February, 2022, 15:25:15 »
just to back up the WW2 link I mentioned , enjoy the little man.
https://youtu.be/9ENete8cfFY

Falling Hare is a 1943 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies cartoon directed by Bob Clampett. The cartoon features Bugs Bunny. In this film, Bugs Bunny tries to prevent the wrecking of an American military aircraft by a gremlin.
« Last Edit: 01 February, 2022, 15:27:21 by chaz »

Oliver Pi

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #9 on: 02 February, 2022, 00:09:34 »
I remember that cartoon!  It has certainly been a few years.  Good show indeed.

Mike40M

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #10 on: 02 February, 2022, 06:30:19 »
A long time ago, a friend stated that when he had blown a J.A.P. speedway engine to pieces, he heard the engine gremlins shouting Free, free, at last free while running to the woods.

chaz

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #11 on: 02 May, 2022, 18:23:00 »
just as an update to the little blighters interfering in the workshop...

a few months ago I made some brass screws for the tank badges on the B40. I made 6 , while I can find them, they seem to be a bit short, I didnt have the badges or rubber seats at the time.

Ive turned up some more brass to make longer screws... do you think I can find the ring die I previously used.

Ive got 14 or 15 boxes with different taps and dies in with every thread, BA, BSW, BSF, UNC, UNF, BSB, Brass, NPT, BSP, Metric upto 20mm, MM over 20mm as well as helicoil and specials UNEF, 26whit, etc.
But no sign of a 3BA die anywhere.
I used it this year, but its now gone!! checked the unit, the garage, cant think where else. not in sets, not in die holders!!

Mike Farmer

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #12 on: 03 May, 2022, 17:07:58 »
 :) :) :) :)

I'm going to add abit to this but its only VERY losely connected. bit of a follow on from 'lost items'.

Quote " I looked absolutely everywhere" and finally found it in the very last place that I looked. Of course it was the last place you looked cos at that point you stopped looking.

Mike 8) 8) 8) 8)