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Messages - Greybeard

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
1
Twins / Re: Removing plunger A10 head races
« on: 29 May, 2018, 22:13:17 »
If they are the original cups there will be a thread though its not very obvious. In fact youd think that a screw in extractor wouldnt stand a chance of holding on well enough to knock them out.
The tools are a bit pricey for a once in a lifetime job but make the job so easy. I also have a 53 B31 that may need new races one day which was part of my justification for buying one  ;)

Steve

2
Twins / Re: Removing plunger A10 head races
« on: 29 May, 2018, 20:22:56 »
Adrian.
Draganfly list this one under the same part number. Might be worth giving them a call to confirm fitment.
https://www.draganfly.co.uk/index.php/triumph-shop/twin-cylinder/product/11860-head-race-cup-extractor-1-4-ball-head-races-1-1-2-x-24tpi

I got mine off an ebay seller a while ago but he's sold out now. Beautifully made and a breeze to use. You'll not get the original races out without butchering the frame as the diameter of the outer race is smaller than than the headstock casting so there's no edge to tap at with a drift  ;)
I put tapered races in my 52 plunger and the steering is transformed, it's silky smooth now. A mod well worth doing. You might find that you have to put a slight chamfer around the headstock casting to allow the tapered inner race to clear it. It doesn't need much and is easily done with a dremel/similar. Of course, the new outer races don't have the threading for an extractor to be used at any time in the future but I reckon by the time they need replacing again I'll be well past caring and contactable only via a ouija board  :o
You anywhere near East Yorkshire?

Steve



3
Singles / Re: B31 chain case
« on: 24 May, 2018, 19:58:40 »
Mine (1953)  has been perfectly oiltight for the last 2 years - since I fitted an SRM clutch - new cork gasket and Wellseal. I use it for all joints and it's superb stuff. But then as Rolls Royce developed it, it would be wouldnt it? I shall be forever grateful to all those tiny beetles that gave their all to keep my Castrol where it should be - its shellac based  :)
 I never use silicon stuff, especially where it has the opportunity to make its way into oilways and gauze filters. I found that the tank filter on my recently accquired AJS 650 was all but blocked by the damn stuff. Luckily a pre-use service and thorough clean of the oil tank etc discovered it just in time. If I get chance later Ill post a pic of the grizzly sight.

Steve

PS the SRM clutch is a revelation despite the cost. One finger clutch operation on a BSA is glorious!

4
Twins / Re: Lubrication of chain drive for dynamo - A10
« on: 12 May, 2018, 08:33:57 »
I fitted the DR kit to my plunger A10. The reduction in mechanical noise was very noticeable and it charges well at lower revs, which suits the raised transmission gearing nicely.

Steve

5
The Star and Garter / Re: Floor covering
« on: 10 May, 2018, 19:55:21 »
Garage floor paint or even a diluted PVA will seal the dust in (you'll get dust from any untreated concrete floor) and a handful of those carpet sample tiles where needed will suffice to protect the finish from centre stands - and it keeps the bike's feet warm in winter  ;)

Steve

6
Singles / Re: Oil filter
« on: 23 April, 2018, 20:56:02 »
Why turn the oil off for a lunch stop?  :-\ If an engine drains its oil tank in an hour or so there must be something seriously wrong with the pump etc. Surely it's only necessary when the bike's going to be left standing for several days or even weeks and that's normally when it's back home. It's a simple enough task to hang a reminder on the handlebars that the oil's turned off.

Steve

7
It's difficult to tell from your photo, Phil, but the tank doesnt look that bad. At this time of year when theres a chance of improving weather (hopefully) I would be inclined just to rinse the tank out with fuel to remove any loose sediment and use it as it is.
Any rust will only get worse if its exposed to moisture. Keep the tank topped up with fresh petrol and possibly a dose of something like Millers VSP which is supposed to counter the effects of any ethanol and you may find that you never have to treat it.
I have a 1937 Sunbeam that has an unlined/untreated tank and its fine.

Hoogerbooger, BSP thread sizes refer to the bore of the pipe, not the outside diameter of the thread. A 1/4 BSP is about 3/8 diameter, a 3/8 is over 1/2 inch  ??? Have a look at the Draganfly website. They have a useful section that explains it. Imperial threads do make life interesting don't they? Metric threads also have their quirks though. I recently made up some long engine studs for a mates 's Yamaha FJ1300. M10 but 1.25mm pitch instead of the usual 1.5mm. I had to cut those on my imperial lathe which is always a challenge  ;)

Steve (wots wondering whether Spring has arrived yet)

8
Singles / Re: Fuse holders
« on: 02 April, 2018, 14:44:16 »
They look like ceramic bodies with tapered ends to me. Beloved of the likes of MZ and CZ. Not paticularly common. I prefer a standard blade type fuse hidden in one of thos black plastic in-line holders like Dabbist uses, hidden away in the dummy battery box. Fitted to all the bikes it means carrying only one type of easily obtainable fuse in the one tool kit which I can swap between bikes.

Steve

9
Millers VSP claims to help. I use it just to keep the petrol fresher. Its also reckoned to be an octane booster. It seems to work in the fuel I keep for the outboard of my sail boat. I tend not to use a great deal though as the engine is only used for manoeuvring on and off jetties if the winds a bit contrary. A gallon has lasted 3 years for that with no ill effects and all the bikes appear happy with it  :)
The best remedy of course is to keep using the fuel by riding regularly. That way it doesnt get chance to take up much in the way of water or go stale.

Steve

10
If your main concern is getting the bike on the road for this summer (if we get one  :-\ ) then I would suggest that giving your tank a good swill out to remove loose muck is as much as you need to do for the time being. It'll not get noticeably any worse for a while. Its water contamination in the fuel that causes the rust and ethanol absorbs it from the air, hence the problem makes itself known quicker than it used to - unless you can track down ethanol free fuel - my local BP garage's ordinary petrol is fine - or use what's in there faster so it has less chance to absorb the water  ;)
Tank restoration, done properly, is quite time consuming and not by any means a quick fix. Personally I wouldnt spend the brass doing half a job. If you're going to restore the bike anyway, then doing the inside of the tank first saves any worry about marking the paintwork.
Ive done a few tanks now, both mine and for mates, and have found that POR15 is the easiest to use. Tapox is a bit thin and watery, and whilst probably ok, I was happier with two coats in my AJS 650 tank. Time will tell. Tank Care Products, which I used in my Matchless G80 tank gives a good coating but is very temperature sensitive in terms of flowing well. Too warm and it goes off too quickly, too cold and it stops flowing. Never used it again though I did get two kits intending to do the G9.
My method starts by giving the tank a good slosh with hot degreaser. POR do one but its expensive. Halford alloy wheelcleaner diluted about 3 to 1 gives good results, though if you fancy the challenge, caustic soda is even cheaper - just be careful!
If there is a sealant already in there, then Sealeater is excellent. Around 25 quid a litre which is enough to do two heavily sealed tanks. Use about 250ml, dont breathe it in, and close the lid. Leave it alone for up to a week. The sealeater breaks down the old epoxy into what looks like cornflakes that are dry and can be shaken out. Another wash with degreaser will shift the dregs. Occasionally, if a tank has been sealed in a hamfisted way, like my AJS tank, it can take over a fortnight to break down very thick layers of sealer. That had great gobs over half inch thick in the bottom but they gave up eventually.
Once the tank has been cleared of sealant then rust removal is next. I use a product called Jebsol 62, which i can get locally atround 30 quid for a 5 gallon drum. Its just phosphoric acid initially produced for cleaning ali milk churns. About a gallon, diluted at 4 to 1 sloshed around the tank will remove every trace of rust. If you dont feel inclinded to swirl it around the tank every half hour or so for a day then simply top the tank up to the brim and leave it overnight. Phosphoric acid wont eat through the steel like hydrochloric does and doesnt damage paintwork etc so is safer to work with.
Once youre happy that all the rust has gone then your next task is to rinse out the tank and dry it before any flash rusting of the wet steel gets a look in. A litre bottle of isopropyl alchohol (rubbing alcohol) is cheap, and tipped into the tank soon takes up any free water. Tipped out, its then just a question of using an airline with a high pressure jet to rapidly dry out the tank.
Its then simply a question of using your chosen sealant to finish the job.
I have tried other chemicals to remove the rust, fertan was one, which i found distinctly unimpressive as it left a loosely adhering purple coloured deposit on the metal that didnt inspire confidence.
Kits are available which do the above but are expensive for what you get, though they do work.
You pays yer money and yer takes yer chance  ;)

If youre anywhere near East Yorks Ill be happy to assist.
Steve

11
Singles / Re: Basic electrics, 1965 B40F
« on: 28 March, 2018, 08:11:18 »
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Classic-Motorcycle-Electrics-Manual-James/dp/1847979955

This should explain everything you need to know.

Steve

12
The Star and Garter / Re: New ebay scam.
« on: 19 January, 2018, 16:34:37 »
There's a batch on there right now though still with a contact email in the text - I quite fancy the minty Square four for 3700, but the Rocket 3 for 3000 sounds like a bargain  :-\ I wonder when my Golden Flash will appear again  >:(

Steve


13
Twins / Re: A65 problems
« on: 03 January, 2018, 15:28:43 »
Glad to see your original post has been edited. Some comments are simply not needed and can be quite offensive.
Good luck with the dead engine.

Steve

14
Singles / Re: shimming brake shoes
« on: 21 December, 2017, 18:46:29 »
Providing the shims are securely held in place there's no reason why not - just make sure that the shim is the same thickness either side of the cam so both shoes are adjusted by the same amount. My Matchless/AJS bikes are fitted with the means to install factory shims to account for wear. The shoe end bears on a mushroom shaped pad pinned into the end of the shoe and the shims are just washers that go underneath it so can't fall out.

Steve

15
Singles / Re: B44 riders
« on: 21 December, 2017, 16:42:28 »
Why the need to screw the backside of each old bike you buy, Mick? Isnt this the one that youve just had the crank rebuilt for and vibrates horrendously? I suppose at maximum revs itll soon be run-in. Hopefully youll not be using the same roads that I or any of my family (or anyone else fr that matter) use whilst youre at it :-\ Perhaps a Jap 600 and the odd track day may get these urges out of your system  ;)

Steve

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