Author Topic: A65T Fork Slider Length  (Read 2135 times)

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Bess

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #15 on: 26 November, 2017, 13:49:00 »
Hi,
     I suggest you adjust the spokes to align the rim 90 degrees and central to the fork tubes.

Best wishes...

DODGE

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #16 on: 26 November, 2017, 14:56:36 »
Thanks for the suggestion but the rim is 90 degrees to the spindle. The wheel is true.
If I adjust the spokes in one position to make the rim parallel to the forks, when rotated 180 degrees it will contact the forks, be out of true and 'wobble'.

DODGE

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #17 on: 02 December, 2017, 14:14:18 »
I'm still experimenting and researching with no solution. The same problem was solved for a triumph by reworking a deformed spindle. The photo in the attached thread is exactly how mine lines up.
http://www.triumphrat.net/classic-vintage-and-veteran/229824-front-wheel-alignment-2.html
I'll now look at that unless someone else has a better idea.

Bess

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #18 on: 02 December, 2017, 15:46:39 »
Hi,
     That's the way its designed, adjust the spokes to bring the wheel central to the forks, the rim 90 degrees to the spindle.

This may be worth a read, they found the lean and thought it was a manufacturing fault:

 http://www.geocities.ws/donaldgreg/restore.htm#Front Forks Revisited

http://www.britbike.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Main=43793&Number=395128#Post395128

If it is still worrying you buy a set as shown in the attached image, these are drilled so that the spindle sits 90 degrees between the forks, they do not have the counter bores.

I have a set with counter-bores on my A50 and 2 sets without on my A65's, I haven't had a problem with either.

Best wishes...
« Last Edit: 02 December, 2017, 15:52:48 by Bess »

DODGE

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #19 on: 02 December, 2017, 18:32:35 »
Thanks Bess,
I must be missing something - are you saying that the wheel should be on a slight angle?
I have checked the following:
 - sliders and end caps have 'counterbores'
 - LH slider approx 1/8 inch longer than RH slider (brake side). LH end cap approx 1/8 inch thinner than RH end cap.
 - LH & RH sliders and caps spindle 'bores' not at 90 degrees to slider. LH slider bore < 90 degrees with slider when measured wheel side and above. RH slider bore > 90 degrees with slider when measured wheel side and above.
 - wheel spindle not bent
 - wheel 90 degrees to the spindle and true
 - when assembled with or without springs, the wheel is slightly cocked-off (i.e not parallel to the sliders - leaning to the LHS at the top)
 - small amount of play between the brake plate and the lug on the RHS slider (i.e. not pushing the wheel over).
It seems to me that the wheel leans to the left because the spindle bores and uneven leg lengths force it that way. I know you and others have mentioned that the parts are meant to be like that, but is the wheel really meant to be on an angle, even if the top of the rim is central between the fork legs?
Thanks
Andrew

Bess

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #20 on: 02 December, 2017, 20:12:26 »
Hi Dodge,
               Yes, at an angle, as you can see from the number of people experiencing the issue it cant be anything else.

The sliders were made in one piece, the spindle hole was drilled at an angle then the ends sliced off with the hole in the middle to create the clamps. That's why one side is longer than the other.

Best wishes...

DODGE

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #21 on: 03 December, 2017, 00:09:00 »
Thanks Bess,
out of interest - why did BSA design and manufacture A65 fork components that obviously offset the front wheel to a 'weird' angle?
Thanks
Amdrew

Bess

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #22 on: 03 December, 2017, 10:32:38 »
Hi Dodge,
                I don't know, I have researched without success.

Best wishes...

DODGE

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #23 on: 08 January, 2018, 08:54:41 »
Thanks everyone for the advice.
Unfortunately I could not accept that the wheel should not be parallel to the forks so I have sourced and fitted a pair of 1970 Triumph sliders and spindle end caps. They fitted perfectly and the wheel is now central to the forks, parallel to the sliders/stancions and perpendicular to the road. No adjustment to spokes needed.
Rather than BSA deliberately boring the spindle 'hole' on an angle, maybe the metal has suffered 'creep' over the last 47 years due to the stress applied when aligning the different length sliders - I'm not sure if the loads would be sufficient though.
I'll keep the old sliders with the rest of the original bike in case I sell it one day and the new owner wants it with the original wonky wheel.
I'd be very interested to learn more on the subject if anyone knows more.
Cheers
Andrew

AWJDThumper

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Re: A65T Fork Slider Length
« Reply #24 on: 08 January, 2018, 13:50:09 »
Thanks Bess,
out of interest - why did BSA design and manufacture A65 fork components that obviously offset the front wheel to a 'weird' angle?
Thanks
Amdrew
Andrew - from what I have understood from this post, BSA machined your particular fork sliders so that the front axle is not perpendicular to the axes of the sliders. Had it been caused by 'metal creep' or accident damage then either of these causes should be obvious.

The only thing that immediately comes to mind as to why you might want to tilt the front wheel is if you are going to use the bike with a sidecar. Normally, with a sidecar fitted, you need to apply a certain amount of lean out to the bike (it must lean away from the sidecar). I haven't thought this through yet, and this might be utter nonsense, but the bike's handling might be improved if the front wheel is tilted to compensate for the lean out; that is to keep the front wheel vertical with the bike set up to lean to the right. Your longer LH fork slider seems to be consistent with this idea.

However, I haven't found any reference to tilting a front wheel in this manner yet but I'll dig a bit deeper and see if I can find anything.