Author Topic: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL  (Read 274 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Riding B44R

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« on: 27 October, 2017, 17:28:01 »
I recently acquired my 1967 B44R and hope to be out and about on it when the weather's fine.  Looking in the manuals, BSA scheduled Castrol XL for engine oil and Castrol 90EP for the gear box.  Obviously these particular grades are not available these days.  Can someone advise me of the recommended Castrol 2017 equivalents please, as I would like to stick with Castrol if possible. On the Castrol web-site they list the B25 and the B50 but not the B44R.

STAR TWIN

  • Royal Star
  • ***
  • Posts: 129
  • A7 A10 B31 WDB40
    • View Profile
    • Strange Sheep
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #1 on: 27 October, 2017, 19:02:57 »
Castrol XL is still available. I have 20 litres in my shed. Have a look at Morris lubricants website. They have oils for every possible use. My rule of thumb is straight 40 for roller big ends, 20-50 for plain big ends. Many people use multigrade for everything with no problems. It's a big subject with many strong opinions. Essentially, if you use a reputable oil and change it regularly you won't have any problems.

Bess

  • Silver Star
  • ****
  • Posts: 253
    • View Profile
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #2 on: 28 October, 2017, 08:32:29 »
Hi,
    If you prefer Castrol this maybe worth a look

https://www.castrol.com/en_gb/united-kingdom/products/cars/classic-oils.html

Best wishes...

ANDY HIGHAM

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 37
    • View Profile
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #3 on: 28 October, 2017, 14:46:29 »
Castrol XL is still available. I have 20 litres in my shed. Have a look at Morris lubricants website. They have oils for every possible use. My rule of thumb is straight 40 for roller big ends, 20-50 for plain big ends. Many people use multigrade for everything with no problems. It's a big subject with many strong opinions. Essentially, if you use a reputable oil and change it regularly you won't have any problems.
Why? Straight 40 has no advantages over 20/50. In really cold weather it may not even flow through the oilways properly.
"R" type oil does have an advantage in roller bearing engines as the molecule chains are more resistance to the shear stresses imposed on the oil by rolling bearings.
I am a firm believer in the abilities of scientists and technicians to develop better oils than the oils of 50 years ago. I use fully synthetic 20/50 in my B31

griffo

  • Blue Star
  • **
  • Posts: 62
    • View Profile
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #4 on: 28 October, 2017, 22:06:49 »
What ever clapper rings you're bell.. For me the fully synthetic oil can leave the engine like a Welshmans garden... Full of leaks... Simular thing with the semi-synthetic.  The rule of thumb I use is pre-65, 40 grade and 20/50 for younger motors. Change it regularly, specially at this time of the year so the motor has nice clean oil in for the Winter. Depends on the mileage, usually 1.5k Another change before going to the Manx. Trials/long distance reliability Cub gets oil change every 1k miles  and I have never wrecked an engine due to oil failure... Just make sure it is good oil and not this premium grade, costs a fortune and contains more additives than an old motor needs and is expensive. Castrol, Morris's, Elf and various grades are not too costly and do a great job...  Griff
Safe riding saves pinch marks on the seat...

ANDY HIGHAM

  • Star
  • *
  • Posts: 37
    • View Profile
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #5 on: 28 October, 2017, 22:44:38 »
Sorry I cannot agree with you, thick treacle like oil is not a substitute for good surfaces and gaskets.
There is a common misconception that thicker oil has better lubricating properties. Bullshit, thinner oil reaches the bearings faster. Film strength and shear resistance are more important, additives such as zinc improve wear resistance on high pressure areas like cam followers.
I repeat THERE IS NO CORRELATION BETWEEN VISCISITY AND LUBRICATION PROPERTIES

STAR TWIN

  • Royal Star
  • ***
  • Posts: 129
  • A7 A10 B31 WDB40
    • View Profile
    • Strange Sheep
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #6 on: 29 October, 2017, 06:35:18 »
Very true. Classic oils have higher levels of ZDDP than synthetic oils. Synthetics are excellent but are slightly compromised by having to avoid contaminating catalytic converters in exhausts.
Multigrades are fine, just don't prolong the oil change interval over much. In fact, the same advice applies to monogrades.
If you intend using synthetic oils, make sure your bike is well run in first.
There are strong opinions out there. As an old lifelong motorcyclist once said, if you were stuck, you would be happy to use melted butter.

Bess

  • Silver Star
  • ****
  • Posts: 253
    • View Profile
Re: CORRECT GRADE OF OIL
« Reply #7 on: 29 October, 2017, 10:28:37 »
I love the oil subject, great to listen to at the end of a drinking session in the pub  :) :) :) :)

here are probably more myths and misconceptions about oil and lubrication than any other subject in motorcycling. Gerry Bristow attempts to set straight some of the errors that masquerade as facts... Gerry Bristow spent most of his working life in the oil industry, with Duckhams, BP and others.

http://www.realclassic.co.uk/techfiles/oil030319.html


« Last Edit: 29 October, 2017, 10:30:40 by Bess »