Author Topic: MOT changes for historical vehicles  (Read 284 times)

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Bess

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MOT changes for historical vehicles
« on: 14 September, 2017, 21:00:43 »
« Last Edit: 14 September, 2017, 21:02:48 by Bess »

A10 JWO

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #1 on: 16 September, 2017, 15:20:05 »
Here it is. Hope they told the Road Fund Licence Department.

Agree or not?

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/roadworthiness-testing-for-vehicles-of-historic-interest

The outcome from the ‘Roadworthiness testing for vehicles of historic interest’ consultation was released on 14 September 2017.

We have decided that most vehicles over 40 years old (on a rolling basis) will now be exempt from MOT testing.

Those that have been ‘substantially changed’ will still require yearly testing. We have prepared draft guidance as to what constitutes “substantial change” in the context of old vehicles. We plan to finalise the guidance during November 2017. If you have any questions or feedback about it please contact roadworthinesstesting@dft.gsi.gov.uk.
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burnside
 
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Re: Rolling 40 year MOT Exemption
Unread postby burnside » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:06 pm

Vehicles of Historical Interest (VHI): “Substantial Change” Draft Guidance
Most vehicles first registered over 40 years ago will as of 20 May 2018 be exempt from periodic testing, unless they have been substantially changed1.
Public Service Vehicles (PSVs) with 12 or more seats and large goods vehicles (i.e. goods vehicles with a maximum laden weight of more than 3.5 tonnes) will not be subject to a general exemption from periodic testing at 40 years and will be within the testing regime.
The criteria for substantial change
A vehicle will be considered to have been substantially changed (and hence not to have been historically preserved or maintained in its original state and to have undergone substantial changes in the technical characteristics of its main components) if it meets one of the following criteria. Such vehicles will not be considered of historical interest and will be continue to be subject to vehicle testing.
Criterion 1
If a vehicle has a power to weight ratio of more than 15% in excess of its original design, unless such a modification took place before 1988.
Criterion 2 If a vehicle:
 has been issued with a registration number with a ‘Q’ prefix; or
 is a kit car assembled from components from different makes and model of
vehicle; or
 is a reconstructed classic vehicle as defined by DVLA guidance; or
 is a kit conversion, where a kit of new parts is added to an existing vehicle, or
old parts are added to a kit of a manufactured body, chassis or monocoque bodyshell changing the general appearance of the vehicle.
While reconstructed classic vehicles and kit conversions can have age-related registration numbers that are more than forty years old, they are not VHIs. Radically altered vehicles should have registration plates with a “Q” prefix, but if a keeper considers they have such a vehicle with an original registration plate they should either test it or establish whether it is a radically altered vehicle.
There are existing DVLA processes for registering reconstructed classic vehicles, kit conversions, and radically altered vehicles with the latter making use of the 8 point rule. (https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-registration).
1 If the type of vehicle is still in production, it is not exempt from periodic testing.
If the keeper of a vehicle of more than forty years old is uncertain about whether the vehicle meets either of the two criteria, then they should seek professional advice. For example, the advice of a qualified mechanic or a historical vehicle expert.
The process for vehicle keepers declaring an old vehicle is exempt from testing
Every year vehicle keepers are required to licence their vehicle. Part of this process includes paying Vehicle Excise Duty (Vehicle Tax). Where the vehicle that year is over 40 years old at the beginning of January then from April of that year the vehicle keeper is exempt from paying this tax. The vehicle keeper must apply for the exemption from tax at a Post Office that deals with vehicle tax. Further advice can be found via the following link:
https://www.gov.uk/historic-vehicles/ve ... ehicle-tax
It is intended that alterations be made to these processes to take account of the “substantial change” rule related to vehicle testing.
On-Line
Please note the first time you apply to licence your vehicle in the historic tax class you must apply at the Post Office. Subsequent re-licensing transactions can be completed on-line.
Where the vehicle keeper is re-licensing their vehicle on-line it is intended that an additional question be asked whether the vehicle has a current MOT and the vehicle keeper will be required to declare that their vehicle has not been substantially changed since 1988. Appropriate safeguards will be in place that will prevent a vehicle keeper from declaring the vehicle is over 40 years of age and progressing to the next stage of the licensing process before first declaring or not as to whether their vehicle has been substantially changed.
At the Post Office
Where the vehicle keeper is licensing their vehicle at the Post Office it is intended that an amendment will be made to form V112 to enable keepers of historical vehicles to declare their vehicle is exempt from requiring an MOT.

Draft Advice (not part of the Draft Guidance)
What do I need to do if I am responsible for a vehicle aged more than 40 years old and first registered in or after 1960?
From 20 May 2018 most of these vehicles will not need a valid MOT certificate to be used on public roads. You still need to keep the vehicle in a roadworthy condition and can voluntarily have a test. We recommend continued regular maintenance and checks of the vehicle.
You need to check whether the vehicle has been substantially altered since 1988, checking against the criteria (in the guidance above). If it has been altered substantially a valid MOT certificate will continue to be required. If you are unsure check, for example from a qualified mechanic or expert on historic vehicles. If you buy a vehicle, we also recommend checking with the previous owner if you can.
If your vehicle is exempt from needing an MOT test (and you do not choose to do not have a valid MOT certificate for it) you will need to declare this when you apply for the exemption from road tax.
What do I need to do if I am responsible for a vehicle first registered before 1960?
These vehicles are already exempt from the requirement for a valid MOT certificate to be used on public roads. You still need to keep the vehicle in a roadworthy condition and can voluntarily have a test. We recommend continued regular maintenance and checks of the vehicle.
You need to check whether the vehicle has been substantially altered since 1988 checking against the criteria (in the guidance above). If it has been altered substantially, an MOT certificate will be required for its use on public roads from 20th May 2018, even if the vehicle has previously not required an MOT.
If your vehicle is exempt from needing an MOT test (and you do not have a valid MOT certificate for it) you will need to declare this when you apply for the exemption from road tax.

If you are responsible for a large goods vehicle (more than 3.5 tonnes) or public service vehicle (with 12 or more passenger seats), you will continue to require a valid test certificate.
If you are responsible for a large goods vehicle (more than 3.5 tonnes) or a public service vehicle (with 12 or more passenger seats), you will require a valid test certificate if the vehicle has been substantially altered since 1988 or if, in the case of
a goods vehicle, it is used when laden or towing a trailer.

Greybeard

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #2 on: 17 September, 2017, 19:20:19 »
On a personal note it sounds great to me, my 1979 Spitfire will become a viable toy in 2019  :)  Having said that I'll still run the old cars down to the garage for a brake test now and again. For the powers that be to agree to this, there can't have been a noticeable jump in the accident rate involving pre-1960 MOT exempt cars/bikes.
That's no more than I would have expected in reality. In a previous life I was an Accident Investigator and Traffic Patrol Officer for many, many years and I can point to only one accident that I went to that was a direct result of mechanical failure. It was a Ford Orion (remember those?) which parted a lower ball joint, and that was only because the mechanic who'd replaced it forgot to put the nyloc nut on it  ::)
The accidents almost invariably happened because Isaac Newton had taken over the handlebars or steering wheel from the 'expert driver' or the 'inattentive'.
Brake failure was occasionally put forward as an excuse but the failure was generally tardiness in getting the right foot off the accelerator and onto the brake pedal, if at all. It was surprising how many 'failed' brake systems left long skid marks.
As we all know, an MOT doesn't necessarily guarantee that the vehicle is safe to use.

Steve
Steve from East Yorkshire - Not the Greybeard of the A7/A10 forum who was not actually registered on this one when I signed up ;-)

JulianS

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #3 on: 17 September, 2017, 20:07:24 »
It is interesting to read what it says about reconstructed classics - ie built from bits of more than one bike - not being exempt not being of historical interest.

Need to watch that one.

Greybeard

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #4 on: 17 September, 2017, 20:56:38 »
I could imagine the Triton, Norbsa and Harley chopper boys falling foul of that little nugget  ;)
Probably aimed at the more extreme ends of the custom scene, it has the potential to become rather messy.

Steve
Steve from East Yorkshire - Not the Greybeard of the A7/A10 forum who was not actually registered on this one when I signed up ;-)

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #5 on: 18 September, 2017, 06:34:43 »
I think it is aimed at the Series 1 Land Rovers with coil springs and a V8 engine - nowt but the body panels left of the original. And claiming historic vehicle tax exemption. Will modified vehicles lose their tax exemption? It would make sense.
Locally we have 2 MoT testing stations. One does the fine tooth comb bit - even putting my 1913 Douglas on the brake test rollers. The other treats the elderly vehicles with a bit of sympathy whilst ensuring they are roadworthy The first mentioned MoT station was going to fail my Series 1 Land Rover on missing sills. Series 1 Land Rovers don't have sills.
It's this huge disparity in dealing with older vehicles that is indicative of the need for MoT exemption. 

bikerbob

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Re: MOT changes for historical vehicles
« Reply #6 on: 18 September, 2017, 15:18:15 »
If you look at the DVLA website regarding radically altered vehicles and reconstructed vehicles then if they use those definitions then bikes such as Tritons should be okay. Radically altered vehicles have to achieve 8 points and while the website quotes things for cars if you change those for motorcycles ie the chassis becomes the frame if you have the original frame you would get 5 points 2 points for the original suspension 2 points for the steering same with transmission you only get 1 point for the original engine so it should okay to get 8 points for a Triton. If they class a Triton as a reconstructed vehicle the main thing seems to be that the major components should be over 25 years old. So if they apply those rules Tritons and the others should okay but who knows how the DVLA will  operate time will tell.