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Messages - Greybeard

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46
Twins / Re: Scruffy Conical Hubs
« on: 06 August, 2017, 21:30:06 »
Vapour blasting gives a nice finish. Done with glass beads/water it closes up the pores in the surface and polishes it which reduces its ability to collect the muck so cleaning is easy. Powder coating looks ok when first done but if the preparation isnt top notch corrosion can soon get underneath and make it flake/crack. Once that happens it all gets to look scruffy again rather quickly. Same goes for clear lacquer on an ali surface. Wouldnt do for it to look like a jap crankcase would it?  ;)
If you do want em in black then I would go with a single fairly thin coating such as engine paint which lasts very well and would be easier to touch up.

Steve

47
Which BSA do you ride? / Re: Recently restored B31
« on: 05 August, 2017, 09:11:12 »
A fine looking machine. Well done and good luck with the 'hoops'  :D
Its good to know that Britain's finest are still being restored around the world.

Steve

48
Singles / Re: First classic
« on: 03 August, 2017, 22:00:00 »
They are pretty easy to work on, Phil, as most things are easily accessible. Balancing the carbs (done on the cables) is an acquired knack, best done by ear rather than fancy gauges, but once set up tends to be reliable. Exhaust nuts need a proper spanner to loosen and it needs doing as soon as you get the bike to make sure they havent siezed on the threads - an expensive repair! Threads can be treated with optimol anti-seize compound for peace of mind. Valve gear can get noisy but is usually due to endfloat on the rockers which can be taken up by slackening the head bolts and moving them in slightly.
There were reports of valve failure around 60,000 miles at one time, though Ive no personal experience of that.
When I ran Beemers the 'go to' spares supplier was Motobins and I dont recall ever being let down, though in fairness, the bikes were largely trouble free, a starter motor being the biggest expense on one of the R100s.
On a more prosaic note, those cylinders sticking out as they do, can get in the way when the bikes in the garage - shin pads help  ;)
 Hope the BSA crew will forgive this little foray into German engineering.
Steve

49
Singles / Re: First classic
« on: 03 August, 2017, 20:45:32 »
You've certainly got some pondering to do, Phil. Whatever you decide, for a first classic I'd tend to go for something for which spares are plentiful and reasonably priced. Triumph, BSA and AMC appear to be well up in the vanguard in that respect, perhaps followed by Ariel, though with Triumph, you're probably going to be limited to twins. Nothing wrong with a twin of course, though there are twice as many big moving bits to repair should the unthinkable happen. A single keeps things simple and all are very easy to work on (and they also sound the best  ;)  ), most designs being based on 1920s or 30s technology.
The BMWs you mentioned are fine machines if you can find a good one. My first Beemer was a R75/7. A beautifully smooth engine, much better than the R100RT and R100RS that I had later. They always felt a bit rough/lumpy in comparison and I found the R100RS to be decidedly uncomfortable at anything below 70-80mph. I understand that the 600cc boxer was the sweetest of the lot. Naturally, spares are expensive and the bikes do have their mechanical foibles but if the bike is well sorted then you shouldn't need many  ::)

Good luck with your deliberations.
Steve

50
Twins / Re: Fitting of M20/21 girder forks to a late A10 frame
« on: 03 August, 2017, 18:59:47 »
I can see why someone would want to fit girders - that bike looks so right, Trev. Only thing is you've set me of wondering about my B31 now  ::)
Perhaps a hand gear change linkage too  ;)

Steve

PS I enjoyed looking through your website. I shall be paying another visit or two. You passed very close to me when you ventured North over the Humber Bridge. I presume you got through the Yorkshire border control point without too much difficulty  :)

51
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 03 August, 2017, 16:29:53 »
Here you go. Does my bum look big in these?  :)

Steve


52
Singles / Re: First classic
« on: 03 August, 2017, 10:08:48 »
Hello, Phil.
I know it's a bit heretical on this forum, but being of a similar, albeit not quite, stature, have you looked at the AJS/Matchless 500 singles of around 1960? I have a 1961 G80 which has a similar bulk/seat height to my modern Bonnie. It also has enough grunt not to be phased by hills when a larger pilot is aboard  ;) The physical size difference when standing alongside my Golden Flash or B31 is quite pronounced.
Sorry for mentioning the 'opposition', folks, but we love all, well most, old bikes don't we?  :)

Steve

53
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 02 August, 2017, 18:48:02 »
Thanks, Dean.
The panniers are now resplendent in gold, well, Valspar E1610 - quaintly named metallic beige by the supplier. Im rather pleased with them. Ill give em a few days to harden before refitting them but I will post a pic of the progress.

As for the dynamo drive belt conversion. Thanks for the recommendations, chaps. It has been ordered today - along with a pair of front numberplates. A bike just don't look finished without em  ;)

Steve

54
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 02 August, 2017, 09:52:25 »
DVR it has to be then.
Thanks, JulianS

Steve

55
Singles / Re: B31 help
« on: 01 August, 2017, 22:53:59 »
Hello, Dedge.
I have a 1953 B31 (plunger sprung 52/53 spec jobbie) and your head and barrel look familiar to me. For what it's worth, I believe that there should be a gap, albeit a very small one between the flat surfaces you describe and that the seal proper is made by the circular machined surfaces. That small gap ensures that the circular surfaces will mate together tightly. I know the service sheets indicate that it's a dry joint but I do use a light smear of that truly marvellous jointing compound, Wellseal  :D

Steve


56
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 01 August, 2017, 20:50:19 »
Thanks for that, JulianS. If you've used it for that long I'm guessing that you've not noticed any tendency for the dynamo to wear out more quickly  :) It's also reassuring to hear that you wouldn't revert to a chain driven arrangement.

Thanks too, Bess, for your comments

Steve

57
Twins / A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 01 August, 2017, 16:57:28 »
Hello, folks.
I'm gradually working my way through my recently acquired 1952 A10 so that it can become a long-legged tourer  :) When I got her she was still on side-car gearing and the speedo was showing 10mph fast. Great for the ego, but not for the frenetic revs. I eventually tracked down a UK made solo rear drum with 42T sprocket to replace the dustbin lid sized 49T one and whilst I was at it I replaced the 19T gearbox sprocket with a 21T. She now runs very serenely at a genuine 60mph, though I must admit that when I bought the sprocket I hadn't realised the the engine/gearbox unit had to come out of the frame to get at the beggar  :-[ The speedo now shows up to 5mph slow at 50-60 but is around 2mph fast at 30 - which is fine if you know about it  ;)
As the engine is now spinning more slowly I have a mind to fit a belt drive conversion to the dynamo from dynamoregulators.com (I will retain the 6v system which already has an electronic regulator) which does gear up the dynamo and increases output at lower engine revs. Has anyone fitted one of these and if so, what's your opinion on the 'silence' of it?
I'm currently in the process of fitting a set of Rodark panniers to her (very good fibreglass replicas from Craven/Draganfly) - they are now sprayed a matching gold and hardening in the conservatory. I will be lacquering them in the morning, weather permitting.
Other jobs that will be undertaken in due course is replacement of the suspension springs F/R with sidecar weight jobbies as she will spend much of her life 2-up, a tapered head-race conversion and assorted stainless steel bits such as axles/nuts/bolts, Devon rims etc. Most will be done over the winter. For now she'll be ridden pretty much as is. She has been restored at some point, to a good standard and has mellowed a bit so looks used but loved.
We've not been together for too long, but I'm already growing very fond of this old girl.

Steve

58
Twins / Re: Oil
« on: 31 July, 2017, 14:12:23 »
Im playing it safe  ;) straight castrol GP50 in all the bikes with roller big ends and Duckhams Q in the Golden Flash and the Matchless G9. Unfortunately Im down to my last gallon can (ah, a proper, good old Imperial gallon in a tin can, remember those?  ::)  ) of DQ after a mate cleared his garage out years ago and I ended up with a few cans.
I dare say once it's finally gone then it'll have to be something in 20/50 from Morris Oils or even Halfords  :)
With regard to sludge etc. Ive split many engines over the years and never come across one that has been a runner that has worried me. If its a really neglected/dead one that going to be rebuilt, then it'll get a proper clean out anyway.

As for an expert, isn't an ex a has-been, and a spurt a drip under pressure?  :D   I know, it's an old one. I'll get my coat.

Thanks for the welcome. TTFN.
Steve

59
Twins / Re: Oil
« on: 30 July, 2017, 21:16:33 »
Hello, folks.
My first post here despite having run BSA's since the 70s when I passed my test on my D7 De Luxe Bantam  ;) - currently I have a 1953 B31 and a 1952 A10 Golden Flash (both plungers) on the fleet.
I thought this article would be of interest, particularly the reference to detergency. Seems we could be worrying needlessly.

http://www.realclassic.co.uk/techfiles/oil030319.html

Steve

PS My membership form for the BSAOC went in the post yesterday.



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