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Messages - Greybeard

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31
Twins / Re: Crankshaft. Oil pump drive pinion L/H thread.
« on: 25 August, 2017, 14:33:13 »
Don't you just hate it when you come across something like that? If it isn't too bad you may be able to rescue it with either careful use of an appropriate thread file, otherwise a die may clean it up.
Give tracy tools a ring or trawl their website. They do stock a huge range of taps and dies. For rescuing a damaged thread a carbon steel die will be adequate - and much cheaper than high speed steel.

Steve

32
Singles / Re: B31 stand
« on: 21 August, 2017, 18:02:12 »
Hello, Bles31
My 1953 B31 has a prop stand fitted to the nearside wheel stay. I think it's an original fitting though similar pattern ones are available. The inner part of the clamp is welded to the frame to prevent it slipping. The arm of the stand is 9 inches long from the pivot bole to the foot. Many years ago I did buy an aftermarket prop stand for my 1956 B31 (long since gone, unfortunately) which was a clamp on affair to the frame behind the primary chaincase. It was prone to slipping unless tightened to the point where you'd risk damaging the frame so wasn't a particularly successful purchase. If you are rebuilding then perhaps you'll have the opportunity of fixing the clamp more permanently.
Another option is made by this chap -
http://www.vintele.co.uk/fitting/
I have bought one of these intending to fit it to my 1936 Sunbeam Lion but just after it arrived I came across a genuine sidestand for it - the frame mounting was already on the bike but I was missing the prop. That being the case I can't comment on their effectiveness but it is well made and looks well up to the job. It still sits on a shelf in the workshop waiting for me to find a suitable bike to fit it to  ::)

Steve

33
Twins / Re: A65 Speedo ring removal
« on: 16 August, 2017, 21:02:26 »
I'm pleased it worked for you  ;D Don't forget to show us the results when you get the hubs back. It should look cracking.

Steve

PS - I seem to have picked on a nom-de-plume that is used by someone else on the A7/A10 forum of which I was completely unaware. Greybeard is what Ive used on several other forums (fora?) so there was no intention to deceive  :)
Or as that half-dressed bloke in the film said - I'm Spartacus!

34
Twins / Re: A65 Speedo ring removal
« on: 16 August, 2017, 13:49:21 »
You could try heating the hub around the threaded part but youll not want to get it too hot. If you have a propane torch or even an old blowlamp with a good spread of flame and keep it moving so that you dont get the heat too localised you should be ok. You need to get it just hot to the point where if you spit on it the spit rolls off in little balls as it boils (aint science wonderful?  :)  ). The theory is that the ali will expand more/faster than the steel and it should give you that little bit of help when it comes to removal.
Im not familiar with the inside of that hub but i wouldve thought that the bearing will be held in place by a lip inside so forcing it all the way through wouldnt be an option.
If all else fails then it may mean more drastic measures like drilling through the ring in several places so you can break it away from the hub, but that would have to be a last resort that shouldnt be needed with a bit of luck  :P

Steve

35
Twins / Re: Plunger A10 Front Wheel
« on: 15 August, 2017, 21:17:46 »
It certainly sounds like a bodge, Adrian. Mine - 1952 -  has no spacers and the parts book doesn't show any. It should be the stepped spindle 67-5566. Ive been making up a list of stainless steel parts I want eventually. Barleycorn Engineering do one for about 35 quid or there are some on a certain auction website about 45 I think.Having said that, when I do take the plunge I shall probably have an original going spare  ;)

Steve

36
Bantam / Re: Bantam D7 - Oil and Petrol
« on: 14 August, 2017, 17:39:16 »
It's been a while since I ran my D7 De Luxe but the 20:1 brings back fond memories - GAT60D where are you now? The Esso garage I used had a separate 2T petrol pump that mixed the fuel/oil as it went into the tank. I was reminded of the plume of blue smoke behind when I topped 40mph   :) The only reason I mention this is that on yesterday's club ride there was a member with a rather nice 1950s DKW. He was running it on a synthetic 2T oil - sorry, I didn't think to ask which brand - but his exhaust was totally smoke free, even at 50mph. I was rather impressed.  8) Times have obviously changed.

Steve

37
The Star and Garter / Re: B31 Valve seats - lead free
« on: 14 August, 2017, 10:23:18 »
Im with Star Twin on this one, Chris. I converted my Rover P4 to unleaded years ago by simply filling up at the pump with a green nozzle and she's fine ;)
I occasionally treat the bikes to a dose of the Super Unleaded if Im feeling particularly flush but that's as far as it goes. Whether it's psychological or not the modern Bonnie does seem to run better on it and I could definitely tell the difference when I had my over-bored Harley Road King The oldies just carry on regardless.
A lot of firms made big money on head conversions when this all kicked off by playing on the hype. My view was to run it as it is, and mend it if it ever breaks - its saved a fortune so far!
If it puts your mind at rest then something like Millers VSP would do the trick, but I think its main benefit is as a fuel stabilizer if you dont burn the petrol quickly enough.
Check your valve clearances dont tighten up now and again which might reveal some valve seat recession, but sleep easy and ride - not at the same time of course  ;D

Steve

38
Twins / Re: Another tank question.
« on: 12 August, 2017, 18:42:44 »
Debating whether to get my tank cleaned out inside which is awful and get it resprayed or buy a new tank.

It's well worth the effort to clean out the tank properly A10JWO. I've done a few now - it's messy, often totally contrary to H&S  ::), but you end up with a tank as good as new inside and ready for treating - I use POR15 as a final treatment as it's ethanol resistant unlike the old fashioned Petseal which by now will have turned to tar-like sludge in every tank it was put in (I understand the latest version is much better).
If you're anywhere near East Yorks I could give you a hand/pointers to do do it.
Briefly it involves a very strong caustic soda wash-out with a bit of gravel/nuts to halp knock any claggy bits off. Worth having a watering can handy to wash off any splashes that might get on the paintwork if you need to keep it as it is. You need to remove the petrol taps and blanl off the holes - unless you're replacing the taps of course
Once thats done it's job after an hour or two, rinse the tank out thoroughly. Then you need the magic potion. I use a phosphoric acid based cleaner that I get locally from Multex Chemicals under the trade name of Jebsol but there'll be others available. Mixed at 1 to 4 with water I fill the tank right up to the neck and leave it at least overnight to bubble and squeak away. As if by magic, by the morning all the rust will have dissolved leaving a brand new looking tank. The beauty of the phosphoric acid cleaner is that it's kinder to steel and won't eat its way through like hydrochloric acid will, though that does act much more quickly - it's quite nasty too  ;)
If there are any stubborn bits in the tank then leaving it another 24 hours won't hurt it.
Once you're happy with it, it needs a good rinse and a dry as quick as you can to prevent any further rust forming. A hair dryer of heat gun helps. After that it's simply a question of pouring in a tin of POR15, which is similar to Hammerite in appearance, swilling it around the tank to ensure an even coat, tipping out the excess and sitting back letting it dry/cure for a few days.

Steve

39
Singles / Re: BSA B33 sticky exhaust valve advise please
« on: 12 August, 2017, 11:17:04 »
When I rebored the B31 I wanted to add some redex as an upper cylinder lubricant, but everything I read suggested it was now a totally different beast more for cleaning injectors etc. I suppose with modern cats etc they steered away from oils towards using other nasties.
I couldnt find anything that was sold specifically as a lubricant. I resorted to a splash of 2 stroke oil instead, but im not convinced it did any good - the motor did nip up slightly as i recklessly took my eye off the speedo and it strayed up to 35mph  :o There was no harm done as i always ride with my hand over the clutch lever and by the time Id coasted to a stop itd freed off again. I took the barrel off to check it over and I got away with it. Its not done it since and im now able to creep towards 40 at times  ::)

Steve

40
Which BSA do you ride? / Re: A7 Star Twin
« on: 11 August, 2017, 19:35:21 »
Where BSAs Dare has been my bedtime reading this week too - it's made me want one!  :D

Great to see those bikes clocking up some real miles STAR TWIN. Keep flying that flag  ;)

Steve

41
Singles / Re: BSA B33 sticky exhaust valve advise please
« on: 11 August, 2017, 19:30:48 »
Hello, Richard.
How's the flow of oil to the rockers?. I know that the B31/33 doesn't have a feed directly into the valve guides, at least my B31 doesnt, but relies on what splashes around after its been through the rockers. Try slackening the feed pipe banjo bolts when the engine is ticking over to see if some seeps out. Putting your finger over the oil return in the tank will force more oil up to the rocker feed so you can check it isn't blocked.
You could also check that the banjo bolts have been put in the right order as they do have different sized holes. Smallest for the inlet, next size for the exhaust and the biggest for the drain pipe at the back.
My Matchless single inlet valve has a separate feed that can be metered by a pilot type screw on the head. Helpfully, the book says if you hear the valve squeaking then increase the flow of oil  :-\ Did you hear any sort of chirruping noise before the valve stuck?
As Julian says, it could just be a build up of carbon, so a head off job might be the only sure way to find out. It's not a difficult job and can be done in an afternoon.

Steve

42
I do wish they'd leave these old marques alone instead of trying to trade on their history. It's bad enough seeing the 125cc Chinese Landfill bikes with once respected names on their tanks buzzing around  :-\
A mate of mine has just called round with his brand new Norton - it's trying to look the part if you like that sort of thing - but talk about mechanical noise  :o If any of my old bikes sounded like that I'd be stripping them down straight away to see what had failed. He even admitted to being embarrassed by it after he'd heard the 65 year old A10. I got the distinct feeling that he won't be keeping it long.

Steve

43
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 08 August, 2017, 20:09:49 »
Well, the belt is on and quite frankly, I'm amazed at the difference. The engine is almost eerie in it's mechanical silence. The dynamo chain was pretty well knackered and very slack, mind you. The old GF now makes my modern Bonnie sound like a tin can of nuts and bolts  :o Having said that, it is a Triumph so what do you expect?  ;)

Steve (wot's now had continuous rain since about 2am and still no sign of a let-up. Summer? My arris!)

44
Twins / Re: A10 Dynamo belt-drive conversion and Rodark panniers
« on: 07 August, 2017, 21:46:36 »
Thanks, Doink.
The belt conversion arrived this morning actually. Tomorrow's forecast is typically summery with rain all day so it might get fitted if there aint too many chores to do  ::)
The concentric was on when i got the bike. It looks like a new carb. Without stripping it I dont know the jet sizes. It does run very cleanly but im not keen on the appearance. When i can justify another 300 quid i was going to order a new original type amal, though a monobloc is only around 170.  I fitted a new monobloc from amal to my 53 Matchless G9 and it was set up perfectly straight out of the box.
There isnt a lot of room above the carb top with the concentric but having spoken to a very helpful chap at amal (excellent folk to deal with) it seems that the concentric is no taller than either of the others.
Im sure if you rang them theyd be happy to help out.

Steve

45
Twins / Re: Scruffy Conical Hubs
« on: 06 August, 2017, 21:30:06 »
Vapour blasting gives a nice finish. Done with glass beads/water it closes up the pores in the surface and polishes it which reduces its ability to collect the muck so cleaning is easy. Powder coating looks ok when first done but if the preparation isnt top notch corrosion can soon get underneath and make it flake/crack. Once that happens it all gets to look scruffy again rather quickly. Same goes for clear lacquer on an ali surface. Wouldnt do for it to look like a jap crankcase would it?  ;)
If you do want em in black then I would go with a single fairly thin coating such as engine paint which lasts very well and would be easier to touch up.

Steve

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